Feminist Transnational Technoscience Studies

March 30, 2014 University of Toronto From the colloquia series “Feminist & Queer Approaches to Technoscience” This talk is an earlier version of “Keep on Copyin’ in the Free World? Genealogies of the Postcolonial Pirate Figure,” published in Postcolonial Piracy: Media Distribution and Cultural Production in the Global South, ed. Lars Eckstein and Anja Schwarz […]

Enigma Symbiotica

Enigma Symbiotica is a multi-year project on the enigmatic riddle of our symbiosis with increasing technologized modes that are rapidly accelerating our demise. In this video, I begin to crack the code of the ideology of globalized neoliberal techno-capitalism, a modernist project that extends colonial violence. I want to agitate, hack and glitch the contemporary […]

User be Used: Leveraging the Play in the System

This article is reprinted with permission from New Media, Old Media: A History and Theory Reader, ed. Wendy Hui Kyong Chun and Anna Watkins Fisher with Thomas Keenan (New York: Routledge, 2015). What does radical politics look like in the era of networks? In a moment of unprecedented connectivity, what room for maneuver remains in […]

A Future for Intersectional Black Feminist Technology Studies

The most general statement of our politics at the present time would be that we are actively committed to struggling against racial, sexual, heterosexual, and class oppression and see as our particular task the development of integrated analysis and practice based on the fact that the major systems of oppression are interlocking. —Combahee River Collective, […]

Queer Dreams and Nonprofit Blues: Understanding the Nonprofit Industrial Complex

In October 2013, BCRW and The Engaging Tradition Project at The Center for Gender and Sexuality Law at Columbia Law School co-convened a conference called Queer Dreams and Non-Profit blues to examine the critiques emerging from queer and feminist activists and scholars about the impact of funding on social movement agendas and formations. During the […]

Archive from Below: Selections from Interference Archive

Interference Archive in Brooklyn, New York, is a volunteer-run, collectively operated space that explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. The Archive’s collections are comprised of material culture produced and disseminated through social movements. This exhibit has been put together to present visual culture that illustrates the nonprofit industrial complex (NPIC); it represents […]

Introduction

This special issue takes as one of its intellectual and political starting points the work of INCITE! Women, Gender Non-Conforming and Trans People of Color Against Violence. Founded in 2000, INCITE! addresses the intersectional relationships between state violence and interpersonal violence in communities of color. At the root of INCITE!’s work is an understanding that […]

Nonprofits, NGOs, and “Community Engagement”: Refiguring the Project of Activism in Gender and Women’s Studies and Ethnic Studies

This essay centers on the ubiquitous undergraduate curricular offering, the internship, as a fulcrum for critical inquiry about the project of activism in an era of neoliberal government, which casts a long shadow across our intellectual and political endeavors. Though more and more curricula across disciplines and schools are integrating the internship (usually credited as […]

Centering Prison Abolition in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

In Unmaking the Public University, Christopher Newfield powerfully reframes the contemporary crisis in higher education as a result not of impoverished state budgets but of a concerted conservative offensive against the democratizing and equalizing potential of public universities. Newfield notes that attacks on the legitimacy of racial justice projects within universities ranging from ethnic studies […]

From Forgotten to Fought Over: Neoliberal Restructuring, Public Schools, and Urban Space

Introduction Brandeis High School was located on 84th Street in an area of Manhattan known as the Upper West Side. However, 84th Street was not always the Upper West Side. Historically, 84th Street and the area surrounding it were primarily comprised of low-income African American, Haitian, Latino, and White residents. Like so many other neighborhoods […]