Black Data

February 13, 2014 University of Toronto From the colloquia series “Feminist & Queer Approaches to Technoscience” Shaka McGlotten: Why are Black people important? This is how comedian, geek, and author Baratunde Thurston began his 2009 SXSW slideshow, “How to Be Black (Online).” His playful intro, which I have appropriated in its entirety here, led into […]

Local Autonomy Networks: Post-Digital Networks, Post-Corporate Communications

March 27, 2014 University of Toronto From the colloquia series “Feminist & Queer Approaches to Technoscience” Gabby Resch: micha cárdenas has one of those really rich, descriptive bios that looks great on paper and screen, but is so much more interesting and revealing when you peel back the layers and discover this really rich map […]

Trans of Color Poetics: Stitching Bodies, Concepts, and Algorithms

On October 6, 2015, Keisha Jenkins was shot and killed in Philadelphia, becoming the twenty-first trans woman killed in the US that year.[1] 2014 saw trans women of color gaining unprecedented visibility in the mainstream media, an increase in visibility that coincided with a dramatic increase in the number of murders, up from fourteen in […]

A Future for Intersectional Black Feminist Technology Studies

The most general statement of our politics at the present time would be that we are actively committed to struggling against racial, sexual, heterosexual, and class oppression and see as our particular task the development of integrated analysis and practice based on the fact that the major systems of oppression are interlocking. —Combahee River Collective, […]

Poop Worlds: Material Culture and Copropower (or, Toward a Shitty Turn)

There is something virtually every reader of this essay has done or will do today. Poop. Maybe on the run in a public stall or during a cherished break while reading or staring off. Most likely not into a diaper, but maybe you’ll clean one up. Poop unites us in a collective flow of fecund, […]

Queer Dreams and Nonprofit Blues: Understanding the Nonprofit Industrial Complex

In October 2013, BCRW and The Engaging Tradition Project at The Center for Gender and Sexuality Law at Columbia Law School co-convened a conference called Queer Dreams and Non-Profit blues to examine the critiques emerging from queer and feminist activists and scholars about the impact of funding on social movement agendas and formations. During the […]

Centering Prison Abolition in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

In Unmaking the Public University, Christopher Newfield powerfully reframes the contemporary crisis in higher education as a result not of impoverished state budgets but of a concerted conservative offensive against the democratizing and equalizing potential of public universities. Newfield notes that attacks on the legitimacy of racial justice projects within universities ranging from ethnic studies […]

At the Limits of “By and For”: Space, Struggle, and the Nonprofitization of Queer Youth

In the fall of 2010, I received an email solicitation that began: “It’s been said that the act of coming out is a political act. I disagree. Hardly a week goes by when a sports figure, actor, musician or another celebrity comes out with little fanfare. The political act has become a more personal act. […]

Legal Equality, Gay Numbers and the (After?)Math of Eugenics

Implicit in Foucault’s concept is the notion that the exact moment these modes of governmentality are reproducing the relations of rule, they are also providing the vocabulary for the contestations to those relations of rule. —Grace Hong[1] [LGBT-supportive policies] are linked to positive business-related outcomes including the corporate bottom line. —Williams Institute[2] Introduction In recent […]

Dreaming, Telling, Occupying, and Destroying: Interest Convergence between Militarism and Social Justice in the DREAM Act and the Repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”

Introduction During the fall of 2010, one immigrant rights bill and one Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Queer (LGBQ) rights bill became an unlikely pair of potential candidates for passage under the National Defense Authorization Act: The American Development Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act and the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT).[1] […]