Archive from Below: Selections from Interference Archive

Interference Archive in Brooklyn, New York, is a volunteer-run, collectively operated space that explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. The Archive’s collections are comprised of material culture produced and disseminated through social movements. This exhibit has been put together to present visual culture that illustrates the nonprofit industrial complex (NPIC); it represents […]

The Academic Boycott of Israel

The Palestinian Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions Movement has made incredible strides in recent years, from successful campaigns to deny municipal contracts to Veolia, a transit company involved in the Jerusalem Light Rail project, to musician Lauryn Hill’s widely publicized cancellation of a performance in Israel. U.S.-based solidarity work has especially taken off on college campuses, […]

Introduction

This special issue takes as one of its intellectual and political starting points the work of INCITE! Women, Gender Non-Conforming and Trans People of Color Against Violence. Founded in 2000, INCITE! addresses the intersectional relationships between state violence and interpersonal violence in communities of color. At the root of INCITE!’s work is an understanding that […]

Nonprofits, NGOs, and “Community Engagement”: Refiguring the Project of Activism in Gender and Women’s Studies and Ethnic Studies

This essay centers on the ubiquitous undergraduate curricular offering, the internship, as a fulcrum for critical inquiry about the project of activism in an era of neoliberal government, which casts a long shadow across our intellectual and political endeavors. Though more and more curricula across disciplines and schools are integrating the internship (usually credited as […]

Centering Prison Abolition in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

In Unmaking the Public University, Christopher Newfield powerfully reframes the contemporary crisis in higher education as a result not of impoverished state budgets but of a concerted conservative offensive against the democratizing and equalizing potential of public universities. Newfield notes that attacks on the legitimacy of racial justice projects within universities ranging from ethnic studies […]

Mapping Police Violence in Los Angeles

For this collaborative research project we worked with the Youth Justice Coalition (YJC), a South Los Angeles community organization. During the spring of 2011, we came together to understand how gang injunctions work as a tool of racist spatial regulation and management. YJC runs a youth community center and an alternative high school for system-involved […]

At the Limits of “By and For”: Space, Struggle, and the Nonprofitization of Queer Youth

In the fall of 2010, I received an email solicitation that began: “It’s been said that the act of coming out is a political act. I disagree. Hardly a week goes by when a sports figure, actor, musician or another celebrity comes out with little fanfare. The political act has become a more personal act. […]

More than Access: College Programs in Prison and Transforming Education

By working to serve individual students, do we suggest the correctness and justness of the institutions and systems that they find themselves in and that we support with our own work? Conversely, by working to address the manifest injustices in such a system, do we neglect the individual lives presently caught within it? I would […]

Legal Equality, Gay Numbers and the (After?)Math of Eugenics

Implicit in Foucault’s concept is the notion that the exact moment these modes of governmentality are reproducing the relations of rule, they are also providing the vocabulary for the contestations to those relations of rule. —Grace Hong[1] [LGBT-supportive policies] are linked to positive business-related outcomes including the corporate bottom line. —Williams Institute[2] Introduction In recent […]

Dreaming, Telling, Occupying, and Destroying: Interest Convergence between Militarism and Social Justice in the DREAM Act and the Repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”

Introduction During the fall of 2010, one immigrant rights bill and one Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Queer (LGBQ) rights bill became an unlikely pair of potential candidates for passage under the National Defense Authorization Act: The American Development Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act and the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT).[1] […]